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   Welcome to Bad Decisions, Baltimore’s definitive venue for

  those times you wished you could have forgotten, but are glad you

  didn’t.


  Thanks for checking out our new website.  It’s still a work in

  progress but we’ll be getting the full-featured version up and

  running within the next few days.


  If you haven’t visited us before, allow me to fill you in on what
  we’re all about:


  Let’s start with a question. Can you name an occasion that you a)

  wished you could forget, b) wished you could take back, or c) told

  yourself you would be laughing about it in a few months (or years,

  or decades) time?  Are you glad you didn’t forget, glad you couldn’t

  take them back, and glad you’re able to laugh with friends about it

  nowadays?  We can certainly name a couple and it’s events like

  these, that Bad Decisions is proud to honor.  So if you have a story

  that you want to share, or you just want to reminisce while having

  a good time, surrounded by good-yet-still-strangly-questionable

  people, stop on by. 

 

  Hope to See You There...


  Your Friends at Bad Decisions


 










Check out our new commercial!!

Update: The Baltimore Sun Endorses Bad Decisions

  

    Overheard at the new Bad Decisions in Fells Point: "You don't come here for rail drinks."


Well, if you didn't know any better, you could order a simple rum and coke at the recently opened Fleet Street spot. It's an easy mistake to make. After all, Bad Decisions looks more like your average corner bar than a hub for hand-crafted specialty drinks. But that's exactly the kind of unassuming atmosphere owner John Reusing wanted.


"I'm envisioning a relaxed neighborhood bar, with a very unique drink menu," he said.


He's done just that.


Bad Decisions opened June 13 in the space formerly occupied by the decidedly unfancy Island II Bar & Grill (across from Ale Mary's). Aside from the new name and paint job, it doesn't look like Reusing has changed too much with the building.


The awning outside reads "Bad Decisions" on both sides and "Make Some" in the middle. Inside, it has a drop ceiling and a couple of TVs - but thankfully, they were both turned off when I was there.


Bad Decisions offers a handful of draft beers like Miller Lite and Yuengling, but unless you're a hard core beer-head, you're going to want to have a cocktail.


Reusing's had plenty of time behind the bar. Before opening Bad Decisions, he worked at Sammy's Trattoria in Mount Vernon and Chiapparelli's in Little Italy.


"I've been pouring drinks for more than a couple years at this point," Reusing said. "I do all kinds of fun drinks, depending on what kind of mood I'm in."


We're talking S'mores martinis with marshmallow-infused vodka, Godiva Liqueur and graham cracker crumbs around the rim. We're talking martinis with little edible beads in them (modeled after the late Orbitz soda).


When I went, I had a Bee Sting, which was mead mixed with Woodpecker Cider. Yes, mead - as in the ages-old drink made from fermented honey. Mead is known as a sweet drink, but the cider gave it more of an edge. Too bad summer's almost over. If I'd known about the Bee Sting sooner, I would have bought the ingredients and made them myself during these past few months.


I followed up the Bee Sting with a Captain Morgan rum and coconut water. I've had coconut water before, and I can't stand it by itself.


From what I understand, coconut water comes from unripe coconuts. But mixed with coconut rum (an unlikely partner), it helped balance the rum's bite while bringing out the coconut flavor.


As for the hospitality, the bartender had me covered from the moment I walked in. There were only about a dozen people in the place (this was a Wednesday night, after all) so he didn't have many distractions. I went by myself, but was quickly drawn into a conversation about the philosophies of Sigmund Freud.


I've been in plenty of places where a bartender spends half the night chatting up a friend and pays no mind to the rest of the customers. Not so at Bad Decisions. The service was quick and attentive all night.


Considering the highfalutin drinks I had, I was prepared to pay a bit more than normal. The bill for both was $13, which is reasonable.


In a nutshell, Bad Decisions puts substance over style. The place isn't fancy but the drinks are, and that's what's going to hook people


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                                                                                                           Sam Sessa

                                                                                   September 11, 2008

Update: Metromix Baltimore Endorses Bad Decisions:


   Bad Decisions, a new bar at the corner of Fleet and Washington Streets, opened on perhaps the unluckiest day of the year—Friday the 13th in June (though the opening date was intentional). Owner John Reusing is betting that quirks such as this one will be the key to his fledgling business' success. The low-key tone of the establishment gives it a subtle charm that hides the joint's more interesting aspects.


Crowd: Bad Decisions is decidedly for the jeans and T-shirt set; there's nothing fancy about this place at all, and that's how Reusing wants it. It's a little off the beaten path, so it's likely to attract a lot of neighborhood folks, as well as folks looking for something a little different, beverage-wise. It appeals to the young and old alike.


Food: Not only is Reusing the owner, he's also the house cook. When it comes to food, he keeps it simple. He admits that he knows more about pouring drinks than serving food, so the menu is the most basic of pub munchies: Empanadas, Monte Cristo sandwiches, sliders and fries are about as complicated as it gets.


Drinks: This is where Bad Decisions really shines. Reusing is a self-proclaimed "liquor snob;" he's constantly on the lookout for something special or out of the ordinary. He likes to "keep things as in-house as possible," so he makes his own sour mix as well as a rare concoction of spices known as Falernum. Reusing says that Falernum was once widely used, but lost popularity after Prohibition. It adds a pleasant vanilla and almond flavor to drinks.


Bad Decisions also features an impressive selection of mead, or honey wine, which is measured in drams instead of ounces (one dram = about two ounces), and surprising cocktails like marshmallow-infused vodka. Reusing forgoes happy hours and drink specials, offering $2.50 domestic non-microbrew beers and $1.50 Natty Bohs all the time; the fancier stuff costs a bit more, though.


Digs: The awning of Bad Decisions makes it feel as though the small establishment will remain true to its name, but perhaps that's simply to ward off the pretentious. The bar staff, which is made up of Reusing and his brother Mike, greet patrons pleasantly, and are more than happy to explain and discuss the drink selection. The decorating is not complete, but the warm earth-toned walls are pleasant enough, minus patches that need retouching; old time beer ads take up room for the time being. Reusing says he eventually wants the walls of the bar to be filled with pictures of his customers making bad decisions—he already has a few wedding pictures from unions that ended quickly and poorly. Two TVs are behind the counter, but the 'jukebox' with a huge database of songs probably gets more attention.


Insider tip: Ask the Reusings if they have anything special, drink-wise. They're bound to surprise you. Why not try the liquor made with elderberry flowers? Or how about Johnnie Walker Swing, a blended scotch made specifically for cruise ships so that the bottle is able to sway back and forth?


Bottom line: Bad Decisions has a relaxed atmosphere with a drink selection that packs a punch. It's the kind of place to stop by after work, and a likely candidate as a first (and possibly last) stop during a night on the town. Parts of the place, like the décor, are still a work in progress, but it's partly because Reusing focuses on finding unique offerings for his customers. You pay a little more for the off-beat stuff, but it's worth a try.”


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                                                                                                        Kathy Carson        

                                                                                          Special to Metromix

                                                                                               August 25, 2008

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